July 22, 2017  

R.E.M. Records John Lennon's Song for Charity

March 14, 2007 (9:07 am) GMT
A humanitarian crisis in Darfur has moved several artists to record a charity album, including R.E.M. that comes in with original members.

Not only receiving the induction ceremony in Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, is also giving out something. In that evening, the band presents "Number 9 Dream", a song by which is re-recorded to be included in charity album "Instant Karma: The Campaign To Save Darfur".

Involving original members, Michael Stipe, Peter Buck, Mike Mills, and drummer Bill Berry who retired in 1997, the track will be the album's first single released. It debuted in radios on March 12, the same day the band received the induction ceremony.

The album that is going to be released via Warner Bros. Records on June 12 is meant to help the humanitarian crises in Darfur, a region in far western Sudan. It will contain 20 songs made popular by John Lennon. Beside R.E.M., supporting this album are , , , , and many more.

Lennon's widow, fully donates the publishing royalties to "Make Some Noise" campaign, a proceeding activity that works on Darfur's case. "It's wonderful that, through this campaign, music that is so familiar to many people of my era will now be embraced by a whole new generation," says Yoko Ono. "John's music set out to inspire change, and in standing up for human rights, we really can make the world a better place."

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