February 21, 2017  

Leona Lewis' Ex Seeking More Than $2 Million From Her

July 9, 2010 (9:51 am) GMT
Lou Al-Chamaa who broke up with the singer this year reportedly wants money from Lewis because he was significant in her success.
Leona Lewis

' ex-boyfriend is chasing a $2.25 million pay-out following their split last month, according to U.K. reports. The "Bleeding Love" singer, who shot to fame after winning 's U.K. talent show "", allegedly broke up with her childhood sweetheart Lou Al-Chamaa after struggling to juggle their romance with her hectic work schedule.

The pair has known each other since they were 10 years old and dated for more than a decade. And according to Britain's The Sun, Al-Chamma wants a huge settlement for aiding the singer's rise to superstardom. The publication reports that despite Lewis offering him their $900,000 London home, he also wants a chunk of her fortune.

A source tells the newspaper, "He believes he has played a huge role in Leona's success. They have been together for more than ten years and he has encouraged her to fulfill her potential. He believes he has the rights of a common-law husband."

"He even filled in her X Factor application form and believes he then played a huge role in her success... He claims he owns a piece of some of her songs and should benefit financially. She has offered him their house in Hackney but he insists that is not enough. It looks like it could get messy."

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