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George R.R. Martin to Kill More Characters in 'Game of Thrones' Story

August 23, 2014 (5:54 am) GMT
The author of epic saga 'Song of Ice and Fire' says as the story is progressing through the final, it gives him 'a lot more flexibility' to kill characters.
George R. R. Martin

No one is really safe in George R.R. Martin's "Song of Ice and Fire" book series which HBO's hit show "" is based on. At a recent event in London, the author said that he wouldn't hold back as the story was coming closer to its ultimate ending.

"I have a large number of important characters who I switch between to tell the entirety of the story, and that limits who I can kill. ... Sometimes there's only one character who's my eye in a particular location, and if I kill that character, everything going on in that particular subplot is going to be lost," he said as quoted by BuzzFeed.

He added, "The way my books are structured, everyone was together, then they all went their separate ways and the story deltas out like that. And now it's getting to the point where the story is beginning to delta back in. The viewpoint characters are meeting up with each other and being in the same point at the same time ... which gives me a lot more flexibility for killing people."

The sixth book "The Winds of Winter" is still in progress. There is one more chapter left, "A Dream of Spring", before the saga finally comes to a close.

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