February 21, 2017  

Richard Donner and Corey Feldman Say 'Goonies' Sequel Is Still Happening

April 7, 2014 (6:53 am) GMT
The director says he's working to bring back the original cast, while the actor tweets about attempt to bring the best script possible.
Richard Donner and Corey Feldman Say 'Goonies' Sequel Is Still Happening

"The Goonies" sequel is not dead yet, assures director Richard Donner. "If you call 'Goonies' a comic book. We're doing a sequel," the helmer of 1978's "Superman" says when asked by TMZ if he will do another comic book movie. He hopes to bring back the original cast for the follow-up.

In response to the buzz surrounding the sequel project, , one of the original cast members, took to Twitter to confirm, "It's close, then I believe they R workin hard 2 make it the best script poss and if and when they feel confident 2 share w us, U will know!"

Talks about a possible sequel to the 1985 kid-centric adventure film have long been discussed. Last year, another original cast, , told IGN, "It will happen." The now 43-year-old actor added, "I'm 1000 percent certain there will be a sequel. I will bet my children on it."

The original movie was scripted by Chris Columbus from a story by executive producer Steven Spielberg. It followed a group of kids who found a map that led them on an adventure to unearth a missing treasure of legendary pirate, One-Eyed Willie. It starred Astin, Feldman, , Jeff Cohen, and .



TODAY'S HEADLINES

  1. Priscilla Presley's Taking Care of Lisa Marie Presley's Twin Girls Amid Nasty Custody Battle
  2. Pregnant Rosie Huntington-Whiteley Covers Baby Bump in Trench Coat on Lunch Date With Jason Statham
  3. Fergie Shows Off Pert Derriere in Cheeky Instagram Picture
  4. George Clooney Finally Opens Up About Amal's Pregnancy
  5. Adele Named Top Music Legend of the Future
  6. Taron Egerton Is Seen Filming 'Robin Hood: Origins' in Croatia
  7. Possible 'Jurassic World 2' Plot Details Revealed
  8. 'Sherlock' Could Get Axed, Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman's Busy Schedules Are to Blame