February 21, 2017  

Samuel L. Jackson Is the Commander-in-Chief in 'Big Game'

May 13, 2013 (8:49 am) GMT
The Nick Fury in the Marvel Universe is attached to be the president of the United States in Jalmari Helander's first English-language film.
Samuel L. Jackson

Award-winning actor will suit up for his next project. The Stephen of "" has just agreed to star in director Jalmari Helander's "" as the president of the United States. The film marks the English-language debut of the "" helmer, who is a Finnish.

The story of the "adrenaline-fuelled action adventure" pic centers on a shy 13-year-old boy named Oskari who undergoes a test of manhood by spending a day and night alone in the wilderness. On the same night, Air Force One is shot down by terrorists and the boy discovers the most powerful man in the United States in an escape pod in the forest where the two in the end team up in a struggle for survival.

Will Clarke and Andy Mayson serve as co-producers under Altitude Film Entertainment banner alongside Jens Maurer of Egoli Tossell Film and Petri Jokiranta of Subzero Film Entertainment. Alex Garland will oversee the project, which is set to start shooting in late summer in Finland and Germany, and expected to debut during the Marche du Film.

Currently filming "", Jackson will next voice Whiplash in DreamWorks' "", which also includes , and in the voice cast ensemble. The animated film is slated to open in the United States on July 19.

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