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Ed Helms Dishes on Andy's New Position on 'The Office'

September 23, 2011 (9:11 am) GMT
After he is appointed as the new manager of Scranton branch, Andy Bernard is 'feeling a hell of a lot of pressure and anxiety.'
Ed Helms Dishes on Andy's New Position on 'The Office'

The burning question about Michael Scott's successor has been answered in the season 8 premiere of "". 's Robert California took the position for a short time before he was promoted to be a CEO of Sabre, and Andy Bernard becomes the new manager of Dunder Mifflin Scranton branch.

Speaking of what kind of boss he is, who plays Andy says he is "a boss who is terrified of being a boss." The Stu Price of "" further details, "He is making an overt attempt to step up his game. ... [He] is also feeling a hell of a lot of pressure and anxiety."

Helms teases there "is a lot of fun to watch unfold, especially when juxtaposed with James Spader's fabulous Robert California." He adds, "In some ways, Michael Scott really believed he was a great manager. Andy's not quite there yet."

Asked by TVLine about how Andy's new position will affect his relationship with Erin, the 37-year-old actor/comedian explains, "Erin and Andy are basically two weirdoes who are attracted to each other, but incapable of understanding each other. Add to that a boss-employee dynamic and their awkwardness pretty much goes nuclear, especially around Halloween."

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